The importance of Keeping Traditions Alive

While other groups are at swimming, you will be working your way through the following clips and activities relating to Indigenous Australians and keeping traditions alive.

 

View the film clip Tiwi Music: Keeping an ancient culture alive – this is about the importance to Indigenous Australians of passing ancient traditions on through the generations. 

Tiwi Music: Keeping an ancient culture alive

 

Traditional games played by Indigenous Australians for hundreds of years is also about keeping traditions alive. The Aboriginal word ‘Yulunga’, means ‘playing.’ For more information, see: Yulunga Traditional Games 

(http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2755969.htm)

(https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/sport/traditional-aboriginal-games-activities#axzz4nsvJREmh)

YouTube clips demonstrating Traditional Indigenous Games (you will have to watch these at home if you miss seeing them at school during the swimming program):

In class we will play a number of games traditionally played by Indigenous peoples from different areas of Australia (watch some from the videos below).

Students will play an adapted form of each game – we will find time for this in class.

 

Write a reflection on some of the similarities between these and the games they play.

Marn Grook is the traditional Indigenous game that has close links to Australian Rules Football (AFL). Watch the film Marn Grook to learn and help you think deeper about the influence of Marn Grook on AFL. (Marn Grook clip)

Click here for an image of a possum skin football used in the game of Marn Grook. (Marn Grook possum skin football)

Watch the film clip, AFL &The Indigenous Community. (AFL &The Indigenous Community) and consider the contributions of Indigenous players to the AFL. 

Write a reflection on the skills and attitudes that Indigenous players bring to Australian Rules Football.

 

Complete a final reflection on your learning and how your thinking has changed. Use the visible thinking routine, I used to think… Now I think… for this task. For more information, see: I used to think… Now I think… 

Dreamtime Stories

Here are some well-known Dreamtime Stories:

 

The Sharing Stories website will help you to further explore some of the themes and motifs used by Indigenous Australians to tell their Dreamtime stories. Sharing Sto/.0 ries

Watch the videos and notice how young Indigenous children tell the Dreamtime stories particular to where they were born.